Author Topic: Creating a Dual Boot Windows 10 system to test RDJ Beta v2.0.2.0  (Read 255 times)

mitchrapp

  • Jr. Member

  • Offline
  • **
  • 88
Hi, it seems Beta 2.0.2.0 is getting the bugs worked out and close to becoming the stable release.

I would like to test the RDJ beta however, I presently tied up my other computers with duties for my new network (cat6 the whole house, to central comm station).  Therefore, to test I would like to attempt a dual boot setup for Windows 10 Pro.

Here is the info I found on the MS site, I thought I would ask here if any others have either followed this recommendation or have a successful Windows 10 dual boot on a single pc with multiple hard drives operating now and could share what guide they followed to make that possible.

Quote
Greg Carmack - Windows MVP 2010-2020
Independent Advisor
Replied on December 15, 2019
Hi Frank. I'm Greg, an installation specialist, 10 year Windows MVP, and Volunteer Moderator here to help you.

You can install Windows 10 on other hard drives on the same PC. They may not activate, and actually should have separate licenses, but even if they don't Microsoft has made the decision in Windows 10 you can use unlicensed Windows 10 but just won't be able to Personalize it with Backgrounds, Themes, etc.

If you install OS's on separate drives the second one installed will edit the boot files of the first one to create a Windows Dual Boot, and becomes dependent upon it to start. If you unplug the other hard drive during install it keeps each OS independently bootable via the BIOS Boot Menu key.

Follow the gold standard Clean Install in this link which compiles the best possible Install of Windows which will stay that way as long as you stick with the tools and methods given, has zero reported problems, and is better than any amount of money could buy:
https://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_10-windows_install/clean-install-windows-10/1c426bdf-79b1-4d42-be93-17378d93e587

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask back any questions and keep me posted. If you will wait to choose if I solved your problem, I will keep working with you until it's resolved.

I presently have a C: ssd, D, E on Sata III HDs which are backed up to two alternating external esata drives.
I would add a new 2nd ssd for the dual boot, and grab the songs from one of the external esata drives so my primary system is completely isolated from the testbed beta setup.  (one of the esatas will be converted to NAS soon)
RadioDJ 2017, Multiple Live On Air Personality gigs each week.

stevewa

  • Hero Member

  • Offline
  • *****
  • 869
Re: Creating a Dual Boot Windows 10 system to test RDJ Beta v2.0.2.0
« Reply #1 on: May 05, 2021, 03:29:35 PM »
simply unplug your hard drive with the real OS installation on it, and install win10 on the new hd. when you want to switch back to the orig installation, shutdown, disconnect temp hd and reconn old hd and boot. no worries about corrupting the other orig hd.

but if you want to test the beta for a long time ie 7 days running, then rent space on a windows maching through some website host for 1 month to see how it works, so you can still use your original winos installation

mitchrapp

  • Jr. Member

  • Offline
  • **
  • 88
Re: Creating a Dual Boot Windows 10 system to test RDJ Beta v2.0.2.0
« Reply #2 on: May 08, 2021, 01:26:13 PM »
Thanks, Steve, guess that's one way to workaround.  It's my kind of thinking, however am looking for a more elegant permanent solution.
RadioDJ 2017, Multiple Live On Air Personality gigs each week.

stevewa

  • Hero Member

  • Offline
  • *****
  • 869
Re: Creating a Dual Boot Windows 10 system to test RDJ Beta v2.0.2.0
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2021, 04:47:39 PM »
maybe you want to try a virtual operating system, vmware or something free, which would allow you to run a 2nd version of win10 in an isolated memory space?

packzap

  • Full Member

  • Offline
  • ***
  • 156
Re: Creating a Dual Boot Windows 10 system to test RDJ Beta v2.0.2.0
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2021, 04:56:50 AM »
Yes, a VMware like Oracle's VM, VirtualBox (virtualbox.org), is pretty cool to use. It runs the operating system and its software in a separate window and is pretty much isolated from your main system.

The drawback is the learning curve in getting a VM up and going and configured correctly. The positive aspects are a VM is quicker to switch to than a dual boot, you can pause it (or close it), and in the case of VirtualBox, it's free! The cost is just your time.  :-\